The controls

Standard

As mentioned in the first post, Getting Started, I decided to use a PCB that is made specially for the task at hand:

$_57

http://goo.gl/nE9DOy

The aim of this part of the project is to use a GPIO to USB mapping software, the best of which I can find at the moment is Adafruit’s Retrogame. The idea is to wire up each port of the PCB to a GPIO pin on the Raspberry PI, Retrogame then will map this GPIO port to a pretend USB keyboard. The USB keyboard will be detected and used by RetroPie.

So first, wire up all of the connectors (sorry for potato cam).

IMG_20160701_220349

I decided to use cables with a Duport connectors once more, so that I could easily plug and remove the cables when I’m not actively using them/testing. Colour coding the cables will probably be a big time saver as well, saves having to try and follow each cable back when mapping a control to a GPIO (left to GPIO20 for example).

The pin outs vary slightly depending on the model of of Pi that you have, I very much doubt you’d be reading this but be trying to use an old model Pi so I’ll upload a picture of the newer layout here:

Raspberry-Pi-GPIO-Layout-Model-B-Plus-rotated-2700x900

If, by chance, you are using an older Pi simply search on Google for the pin out diagram.

IMG_20160701_220358

Once you’re all plugged in to the free GPIO ports, follow the instructions linked to from Adafruit’s Retrogame‘s github page. I made a big mistake here and edited the wrong part of the config file, make sure if you’re not using an Adafruit PiTFT that you edit the correct section! I spent hours pulling hair out because I didn’t read it correctly.

Once set up correctly you should be able to hold a metal contact on each button to get a response in RetroPie.

IMG_20160701_220337

Feel free to comment below if you have any questions or have any problems with this, I’ll do my best to help.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *